Vets urge owners to desex pets

Cowra Veterinary Centre practice owner Dr Peter Launders with Hannah. Veterinarians around Australia are encouraging pet owners to get their animals desexed.

Cowra Veterinary Centre practice owner Dr Peter Launders with Hannah. Veterinarians around Australia are encouraging pet owners to get their animals desexed.

Cowra Veterinary Centre is urging desexing of pets in National Desexing Month in July, particularly cats, before the long breeding season in the warmer months.

“Vets are often the first contact point for unwanted cat and dog pregnancies and know the heartache involved with unwanted litters,” practice owner Dr Peter Launders said.

“This is why we have joined veterinarians around Australia to promote desexing and provide incentives to encourage local animal owners to get their pets desexed.”

“Pet owners can play a vital role in preventing unwanted kittens and puppies,” Dr Launders said.

“Desexing also provides many direct benefits to owners and companion animals.

“Cats and dogs are less likely to stray, spray in and around your house, or be injured fighting over territory.

“They are often more relaxed and affectionate and, generally, live longer and happier lives,” Dr Launders said.

National Desexing Month was initiated by Animal Welfare League Queensland.

Now in its 13th year, it asks veterinarians around Australia to sign up on the National Desexing Network website (www.ndn.org.au ) and offer special discounted cat and dog desexing incentives within their communities for July. This year’s theme is ‘Lets Talk About Desexing’.

“Vets and animal welfare groups across Australia try to save as many lives as possible, but we have to break the cycle of breeding, particularly of cats who can become pregnant from four months of age, and while still weaning their kittens,” AWLQ National Desexing Network Strategic Director Joy Verrinder said.

“We appreciate the support of vets in this campaign,” Dr Verrinder said.

Last year more than 3000 kittens and nearly 1200 puppies were born, surrendered or simply dumped at one of five AWLQ rehoming centres in South East Queensland alone.

Many more don’t make it to the shelters, rescue groups or pounds, and are abandoned to live and breed on the streets, around shopping centres, and industrial complexes. A list of vets participating in National Desexing Month and the incentives being offered can be found at www.ndn.org.au.

Cats and dogs are less likely to stray, spray in and around your house, or be injured fighting over territory. They are often more relaxed and affectionate and, generally, live longer and happier lives.

Dr Peter Launders