OPINION

Chlorophyll water rises to supplement rock star

Some in the wellness community claim drinking chlorophyll water transforms their skin, fixing acne and inflammation. Picture: Shutterstock.
Some in the wellness community claim drinking chlorophyll water transforms their skin, fixing acne and inflammation. Picture: Shutterstock.

I see you side-eyeing my drink. Are you green with envy?

No. That's the reflection of your drink on my face. It sure is heaps green. What is it - three parts Shrek and two parts Kermit over muddled Hulk?

This, my nutrient-coveting friend, is chlorophyll water. As I sip, it's infusing my cells with potent plant-derived goodness.

Last I heard, the wellness green drink department was fully staffed. Kale, spirulina, apple, cucumber - they're all over that gig.

Those lesser elixirs were merely the support act for the rockstar that is chlorophyll - a water-soluble super-supplement. More than two million likes on TikTok can't be wrong.

I beg to differ. TikTok is where a cat entering a cardboard box receives 33 million likes. A monkey playing with a zip: 25.4 million. Man being slapped in the face with a tortilla: 1.5 million. Shall I continue?

More lifestyle:

I'm sensing there's a 'but'.

If you don't believe TikTok, then trust Reese Witherspoon. She swears by chlorophyll.

Some reckon it helps their gut health. Others claim it lessens body odour.

For what?

A radiant complexion. The TikTokers agree. They say drinking chlorophyll water transforms their skin, fixing acne and inflammation. Some reckon it helps them lose weight and improves their gut health. Others claim it lessens body odour.

Phewee. I guess plants generally do smell nice. So what's the purported power behind the potion?

Chlorophyll is why plants are green. It's the compound that helps them absorb sunlight and convert it to energy through photosynthesis.

It packs vitamins A, C and K, plus antioxidants, which do have immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory benefits.

Chlorophyll supplements contain a water-soluble derivative of actual chlorophyll, called chlorophyllin. It's supposed to be easier for our bodies to absorb.

As yet, you won't hear scientists and doctors chorusing: 'hurrah for chlorophyll! Pour me a glass!' Evidence backing its health benefits is still scarce. While there's also no indication that chlorophyll water will harm you, experts say you're better off just eating your daily greens for maximum antioxidant assets.

Moral of the story: whether you're Reese Witherspoon or a cat in a cardboard box, nobody can ever avoid broccoli and celery.

Anyway, did I ever tell you about a green cocktail I once had called Alien Secretion?

Let me guess: 40 million likes on TikTok?

  • Amy Cooper is a journalist who embraces wellness, but has also used kale to garnish a cocktail.
This story Chlorophyll's rise to supplement rock star first appeared on The Canberra Times.