Red Radials take off to Cowra

A flying group known as the Red Radials will arrive in Cowra on Wednesday afternoon November 23 for a four-day fly-in.

The Red Radials are a private flying group that fly the Yak-52 aircraft and the Nanchang CJ-6 (see below for aircraft details).  

Members of the public are welcome to view the aerial displays on Thursday, November 24 and Friday November 25 which will include formation flying, aerobatics and streamer cutting.

Best viewing areas will be around the airport perimeter, but flying will take place in most areas in the Cowra vicinity depending on weather conditions.

Cowra Rotary will be catering for the Red Radials on all days at the airport.

More information about the Red Radials can be found at their facebook page 

https://www.facebook.com/redradials/

Yak-52

The Yakovlev Yak-52 is a Soviet primary trainer aircraft which first flew in 1976.

It is still being produced in Romania by Aerostar.

The Yak-52 was designed originally as an aerobatic trainer for students in the Soviet training organisation, which trained both civilian sport pilots and military pilots.

Since the early 1990s and the fall of the Soviet Union, many Yak 52s have been exported to the west.

Of the approximately 1800 produced most are now flying in United States, England, Australia and New Zealand.

Engine starting, landing gear, flaps, and wheel brakes are all pneumatically actuated.

Max speed 285km/h (cruise speed 190km/h).

A Nanchang CJ-6 which  is a Chinese design twin-seat basic trainer will fly into Cowra as part of the Red Radials four day visit from November 23.

A Nanchang CJ-6 which is a Chinese design twin-seat basic trainer will fly into Cowra as part of the Red Radials four day visit from November 23.

Range 550 km.

Service ceiling 4000 metres.

Take off distance 170 metres.

Landing distance 250 metres.

Nanchang CJ-6

The Nanchang CJ-6 is a Chinese design twin-seat basic trainer which first flew in 1958, was introduced in 1961 and mass produced from 1962.

The CJ-6 is commonly mistaken for a Yak.

The CJ-6 makes extensive use of pneumatics to control the gear and flap extension/retraction, operate the brakes and start the engine.

An engine-driven air pump recharges the system; however if air pressure is too low to start the engine then the onboard air tank can be recharged by an external source.

Max speed 300km/h (cruise speed 190km/h).

Range 700 km.

Service ceiling 6250 metres.

Take off distance 280 metres.

Landing distance 350 metres.

The Yakovlev Yak-52.

The Yakovlev Yak-52.

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