Grant helps Cowra Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre with preservation assessment

Significance assessor John Petersen with Helen Daly, Bob Griffiths, Darren Mitchell and Tony Mooney during the Cultural Centre's significance assessment earlier in the year.
Significance assessor John Petersen with Helen Daly, Bob Griffiths, Darren Mitchell and Tony Mooney during the Cultural Centre's significance assessment earlier in the year.

The Cowra Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre has been named as one of 52 community organisations to receive a Community Heritage Grant (CHG) from the National Library of Australia.

The Garden will receive $5597 for the preservation needs and assessment of the Cultural Centre's movable cultural heritage items.

Manager of the Garden, Shane Budge, said they were thrilled to be receiving the grant.

"We are very grateful for the assistance we have received through the Community Heritage Grants," he said.

"We received a grant to enable a significance assessment in a previous round and this has been followed up now with funding for a preservation needs assessment.

"This will help us to understand what is required to properly display and store our collection while preserving the collection for future generations.

"Our collection is made up of many different types of art, artefacts and materials, such as ceramics, wood, paper, metal, cloth and more, so a detailed preservation needs assessment will help guide us in maintaining the collection many years to come."

Aileen Weir, Chair of the Expert Panel making final recommendations on applications, noted the vital support that the CHG program provides to community groups across Australia.

"We are delighted to support such a wide range of organisations, particularly small, volunteer managed community groups, who otherwise would have no access to qualified heritage practitioners and very limited funding to appropriately care for much-loved collections," she said.

Since the Community Heritage Grants program began in 1994, more than 1500 projects have received grants totalling more than $8 million, helping preserve significant Australian community history and heritage for future generations.