Cowra residents try to beat the heat for start of summer

From left - Bronson Digiacomo, Chelsea Digiacomo, Braydon Beath, Brooklyn Beath and Rachelle Beath cool off with a dip in the pool on Saturday.
From left - Bronson Digiacomo, Chelsea Digiacomo, Braydon Beath, Brooklyn Beath and Rachelle Beath cool off with a dip in the pool on Saturday.

While today officially marks the first day of summer, the warm weather made an early appearance over the weekend.

Even though we didn't hit the temperatures of some surrounding regional centres, Cowra copped heatwave conditions and plenty of wind on Saturday.

According to Weatherzone, the mercury topped 40.2 degrees on Saturday, making it the hottest day for the month of November.

On top of that, 65km/h winds were also recorded on Saturday at Cowra Airport, according to the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM).

There was a slight reprieve come Sunday, with the temperature dipping down to a high of 31.7 degrees and 3.4mm of rain recorded.

Monday also provided some relief from the heat, with the temperatures hitting the late 20s and early 30s.

Today, however, summer will have well and truly arrived and is set to be a repeat of Saturday, with a high of 41 degrees forecast.

A late shower is also predicted, leading into cooler temperatures for the remainder of the week.

Wednesday, December 2 will only reach 30 degrees according to Weatherzone, with a low of 13.

A predicted high of 32 on Thursday and 34 on Friday will round out the week before a few showers on the weekend.

According to the BOM's Summer Climate Outlook released late last week, Australia can expect a wetter than normal summer, but bush and grass fires cannot be ruled out completely.

The Bureau's Head of Operational Climate Services Dr Andrew Watkins said Australia continues to experience an active La Nina event which is expected to remain until at least the start of autumn.

"While the last three weeks have been dry in many parts of the country - due in part to unfavourable tropical weather patterns - it does not signal a weakening of La Nina," he said.

"Our climate outlook is the opposite of what we experienced last year in Australia.

"This summer, New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland are expected to see above average rainfall, meaning we face an increased risk of widespread floods.

Dr Watkins said that while the risk of bushfires isn't as high as last summer, fires will occur.

"There's a great chance of grass fires in some areas as recent rain and warm weather have led to vigorous vegetation growth," he said.

"South eastern Australia is one of the most fire-prone regions in the world. Even short periods of hot and dry weather increase the risk of fire in summer."