Medical students wrap up year long rural attachments

The ANU students following their cultural competency training with Robyn Coffey, Warren Williams, Dr Stewart Sutherland and Dr Lousie Baker.
The ANU students following their cultural competency training with Robyn Coffey, Warren Williams, Dr Stewart Sutherland and Dr Lousie Baker.

Eleven students from the Australian National University (ANU) visited Cowra and Young last week to wrap up their third year rural attachments.

The students took part in a week long rural stream teaching block which was designed to consolidate their knowledge and skills prior to exams.

Covered in the week were case based discussions over a wide range of topics including hematology, gastroenterology, cultural competency, clinical exam prep and histopathology.

Cowra doctor Louise Baker said the rural attachments gave the students a chance to experience rural medicine.

"Even if the medical students don't intend to be rural doctors in the future, understanding the limitations and capacity rural doctors have is absolutely vital," she said.

"Understanding the distance issues, the infrastructure availability, access to CT scans or ultrasounds, the interesting role of being a rural generalist and looking after people at a hospital as well as a community general practice setting.

"Hopefully it also gives them an opportunity to experience Cowra and it will make them think it is a nice place to come to in the future," she said.

Dr Baker thanked Cowra's Robyn Coffey and Warren Williams for giving up their time to help the students with their cultural competency training.

She also thanked doctor Stewart Sutherland from the ANU's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health faculty for facilitating the training.

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