Larsen honoured after upholding the spirit of rugby for two decades

HONOUR: Peter Larsen and former Central West Rugby Union chief executive officer Peter Veenstra at the 2018 grand finals. Photo: NICK McGRATH
HONOUR: Peter Larsen and former Central West Rugby Union chief executive officer Peter Veenstra at the 2018 grand finals. Photo: NICK McGRATH

Peter Larsen spent 20 years as part of the Central West Rugby Union’s judiciary system in a bid to uphold the spirit of rugby.

Few could argue, even those that fronted his judiciary, the Cowra-based rugby pundit didn’t do that in spades.

Larsen was honoured with life membership of the CWRU, and presented with his medal at the Blowes Clothing Cup grand finals at Endeavour Oval in Forbes..

Two decades on the judiciary, 19 of which he served as chairman, Larsen says he initially got involved to give back to the game and ended up staying for the long haul to help maintain a fair standard to arguably the toughest gig in the region.

“It is challenging,” he smiled, retiring from the post at the end of the 2017 season.

“But I honestly think there’s not too many mistakes over the years. I think we got it pretty right, we showed a bit of empathy but at the same time maintained a certain standard where guys knew if they came before us we would uphold the spirit of rugby.”

Larsen has served with a number of panel members, too many to count over the course of two decades, and thanked those who contributed in a “totally voluntary” role.

He made special mention of Kim Rickards, Fred Boog, David Greatbatch, Chris Messenger and Bob Sullivan who he described as “very fair men making judgements in difficult circumstances”.

Retired CWRU chief executive officer Peter Veenstra presented Larsen with his medal and said the long-serving judiciary chairman had made an “enormous contribution” to rugby union in the central west.

“Through his leadership the judiciary has been recognised as the best judiciary outside of Sydney, and that’s run by three senior council in Sydney,” Veenstra said.

“Pete’s not legally trained but does a great job and the reputation he’s earned for the judiciary is something to be proud of. He’s done a great job.”

Larsen was thrilled to receive the life membership medal.

“I never expected it, and didn’t do it for the award. I did it for the love of the game and a respect of the players, to see a job done properly. I’m shocked, but very proud,” he added.

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