Men's Health Week 2018

In focus: Men’s Health Week 2018 encourages men to make positive connections with their doctor, family, friends and colleagues in managing their health.
In focus: Men’s Health Week 2018 encourages men to make positive connections with their doctor, family, friends and colleagues in managing their health.

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Men – Are you all right? This is the question to ask yourself this Men’s Health Week. 

When comparing men and women’s health, the Australian Bureau of Statistics says it is more likely that the answer is no. 

Statistics reveal a boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78 years while a girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old.  

Also, right from the start, boys suffer more illness, and accidents than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that's five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

The common causes of the death of men include: Ischaemic heart diseases, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, cerebrovascular diseases, chronic lower respiratory diseases and malignant neoplasm of prostate.

So how can men ensure their health? By actively seeking medical help and advice on a regular basis. 

Queensland general practitioner Greenslopes Medical Centre Dr Cliff Quinn has an interest in men's health and said men need to build a strong relationship with their doctor.

"Most doctors are there to help you and they are your specialist in life," he said.

"Men should find a good doctor they can talk to openly and share their health problems with without being embarrassed.

"They need to come to the doctor and speak to them about health and weight issues.

"They need to find the right doctor and stick with him so they know all their past history, issues and family history and they can advise them as to the best medical plan."

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Dr Quinn said prevention plays a key role for men in maintaining good health.

"Blood pressure is extremely important, as is cholesterol and blood tests for the prostate," he said.

"If their cholesterol is elevated check it yearly and the doctor can advise them about how to improve cholesterol through diet, exercise and pharmacological control should also be considered depending on the case.

"To prevent heart disease have a stress echo if they're experiencing chest pain or have a history of artery disease. 

"Get regular health check ups, exercise and have a healthy diet."

Dr Quinn said by making good connections within the community, especially in the area of health care, health outcomes for men can be improved. 

Men are being encouraged during Men’s Health Week, which runs from June 11 to 17, to make connections with fathers, sons, colleagues and friends and take preventative measures to ensure they live a healthy lifestyle. 

  • menshealthweek.org.au